Responsibilities of Non-Custodial Parent Pending and After Divorce

The responsibilities of the custodial parent and the non-custodial parent to change during the course of a divorce proceeding. In cases where the parents are not married, or if the parents are not divorced, it is important to have the right legal advice, explained fortmyersfamilyattorneys.com. Family law attorneys offer comprehensive legal services through telephone, live chat, email, written correspondence and video conferencing. Contact experienced Buffalo family law attorneys for assistance in family law matters.

Handling family law matters, such as custody and visitation rights of children, can be very confusing and stressful. It is best to seek legal guidance from an experienced family law attorney who has experience in these issues. Experienced family law attorneys also know the local laws regarding child custody, visitation rights of grandparents, foster care, termination of parental rights, paternity, and juvenile delinquency. These laws can make a huge difference in the outcome of your case and they are the only person who can make the determination.

 

When parents struggle for custody of their child or children, they often fight over the availability of child support payments. Although both parents have equal legal responsibilities to the children, custodial parents often receive lower child support payments. Unfortunately, many custodial parents do not understand the long-term benefits of child support payments and do not contribute financially to their children. In addition, non-custodial parents may receive less than custodial parents in support payments because they may not meet income requirements for tax purposes.

 

During a custody dispute, both parents can receive advice from family law or child support and custody attorneys on a number of issues including the importance of setting up child support payment arrangements, and the effects of separation on the child’s custody and visitation rights. Parents must work out child support payments that meet their budget and are sufficient to care for the children. The court will issue an order determining support after taking into consideration the financial circumstances of each parent. In some cases, the judge will require joint custody and allow both parents to seek custody based on individual child custody and visitation schedules.

 

The importance of child support is determined by the court based on the best interests of the child. The court considers the child’s physical, emotional, and psychological needs during the early years of his or her life. Often, a child support payment is established prior to the divorce and will cover costs such as daycare, transportation, medical attention, and education. If the parents separate when the child is young, child support does not continue beyond the age of eighteen. However, if the parents remain married until the child is an adult, joint custody and visitation rights can be shared.

 

Child support enforcement officers in all courts encourage communication between parents and children regarding their custody and visitation. Unfortunately, many times children are left with no one to speak to because the custodial parent has failed to pay child support. Many times this lack of communication leads to conflict between the child and his or her custodial parent. The custodial parent may refuse to pay child support and may convince the child that he or she does not need the assistance. This can lead to serious consequences for the child and the parents.